Short days, long nights and more news from Alex Gage

Because the UK is closer to the North Pole than the Equator, there are significant variations in the length of our days and nights. These seasonal changes pose a variety of vision-related challenges, which might affect your optimal choice of eyewear.

Low sun The sun is lower in the sky between late autumn and early spring, often shining directly into your eyes. Our sunglasses will reduce dazzle, as well as protecting against harmful ultraviolet light.

Changes from day to night Photochromic lenses graduate their tint according to the amount of light reaching them. They’re very effective as ambient light levels drop, which is also useful when moving between indoor and outdoor environments.

Reflections Wet or snowy surfaces reflect sunshine that causes people to squint and experience discomfort. Polarising lenses lower the risk of headaches from sun glare by reducing reflections, which is especially beneficial for activities on water.

Take care in the dark Low light levels reduce depth perception and colour recognition. These changes may really affect everything from reaction times to fatigue levels, so give yourself (and your eyes) regular breaks.

Winter sports provide a perfect example of how important appropriate eyewear can be. Skiers and snowboarders often wear dedicated sports eyewear with lightweight polycarbonate lenses.

These shatterproof lenses typically come with scratch-resistant coatings for added durability, and protect against reflections and UV light.

Whether you’re choosing sports eyewear or normal sunglasses, ensure each pair of frames fully covers your eyes without any gaps, to prevent sunshine getting through.

Levels of UVA and UVB light actually increase in snowy conditions or high altitudes, so suitable protection is still important in winter. Our range of sunglasses lenses will block both types of UV rays.

Follow this link to read the rest of our newsletter and please pop in to either Woodseats or Crosspool if you have any vision concerns.

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This entry was posted in Alex Gage Crosspool, Alex Gage Woodseats, Optometry, Vision. Bookmark the permalink.

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